Studio Sale Nov. 22, 2014 10am to 7pm Pre-purchase now before Saturday

As you all may know Marc is always painting and there comes a time when he needs to clean out his painting studio.  This Saturday Nov. 22 from 10 to 7 Marc will be bring a large selection of pieces from his studio to our gallery in Laguna Beach for a sale.  I hate to use the word sale for art but there is no other way to describe it.   If you are signed up for our e-mails you will receive an invitation which includes a lot of the available works.  Please e-mail or call us for more information  Thank you

Phone:  (949) 463-1752

e-mail:  whitneygallery@msn.com     

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FOLLOW US

FOLLOW US ON PINTEREST

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RECEPTION THURSDAY NIGHT 6 TO 9 NOVEMBER 6

Hope to see you Thursday night. Here are some new works hanging in gallery.604

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What Marc Is Working On Now

blog june 2014 206blog june 2014 204blog june 2014 195blog june 2014 166blog june 2014 176blog june 2014 154sculpture for blog 077sculpture for blog 064sculpture for blog 063sculpture for blog 050

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Did You Get Your Wife Flowers for Mother’s Day?

Here is a group of never seen before flowers from my studio.

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Cotton and Linen part 2

Back of painting on cotton has mechanical texture

Back of painting on cotton has mechanical texture you can click on to see clearer

back of painting on linen irregular weave back of painting on linen has irregular texture

back of painting on linen irregular weave you can click on any of these pics

another painting on wood board

another painting on wood board

 

wooden 'key' is pushed into slot to tighten canvas

wooden ‘key’ is pushed into slot to tighten canvas

slots in corner of artist's canvas

slots in corner of artist’s canvas

This is an old painting I did on a wood board, shows off brushstrokes

This is an old painting I did on a wood board, shows off brushstrokes

painting on cotton

painting on cotton

A close up shows the texture the cotton   see under the eye

A close up shows the texture the cotton see under the eye

close up show cottons texture

close up show cottons texture

Maybe the title of this blog should be “More than you need or want to know about the differences between cotton and linen”. I thought I should add some final words on the subject and include some illuminating pics, It occurred to me that the art gallery visitor might not be able to determine what the painting he is considering is painted on. As I talked about in the earlier blog, paintings can be on linen or cotton and I might as well mention wood panel too (also for that matter glass, metal, ceramic and paper but these are rare). If you look at the back of a painting you will see either cloth or a board. If you see cloth it’s either cotton cloth or linen. You can easily tell them apart the cotton is off white and linen is usually a darker khaki. I’ve included some pictures and tried to show the textural differences I talked about earlier. It does not matter how expensive the cotton is, it always seems to give an annoying mechanical quality to the paint surface. Linen cost about 35 dollars a yard and cotton is much cheaper. The oldest paintings were done on wood. Centuries ago paintings were made with tempera paint and this required a stiff support. With the invention and popularization of oil paints cloth became a viable option. Cloth is lighter which becomes important with large paintings. Wood seems to be a good choice for small paintings and work on wood has a beautiful way of showing off brush strokes but with larger work you have to worry about warping and the weight. With cloth, especially linen, you have a hygroscopic fabric in other words it can expand on humid days just like your linen shorts. This hygroscopic effect is something you probably don’t have to worry about because in the late 19th century artist started using specially designed stretcher bars that can be adjusted (While you’re looking at the back of the painting you will notice that the wooden bars have little slots in the corners. Wooden keys can be pushed into these slots to keep the canvas tight). One more curve, if you see a board in the back of a painting it could be a canvas painting glued to a board which is not uncommon, look for a cloth texture on the painting surface. Oh boy what started out as a simple explanation for the amateur gallery visitor has kind of exploded on me so I’ll end it here. A final thought, although the support of the painting is interesting what an artist does on top of the support is of much greater consequence. The next time your wife, husband, friend drags you along to a gallery you now have something to talk about.

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whats the difference between cotton and linen

This is another question I’ve heard lately at the gallery (in our gallery we usually describe our works as oil on linen). If you go to a museum ninety percent of the paintings you will see are painted on linen. Linen is a preferred support. In art lingo ‘support’ means whatever surface you are painting on. Linen is a preferred support for oil paintings because the weave is irregular and can add subtle variety and movement to passages in a painting that would otherwise not have enough interest such as a flatly painted area. Cotton, though commonly used, has a very regular pattern that can look odd and simple. On the other hand I saw a group of cool landscape studies by John Sargent at an auction and when I turned them over I was surprised to see they were on cotton. So good work can be done on cotton too. I noticed the Deibenkorn still lifes at a recent show were on heavy cotton so maybe its fine for work that not trying to look traditional. My own theory is that the shape of the linen fiber (if you would cut it and look at it sideways) is a polygon, it has points, and when a brush loaded with paint is dragged across linen it aggressively pulls the paint from the brush more so than the round cotton fiber. For me that’s a good thing. I guess bottom line is the choice of supports effects how the brushstrokes look.

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